Use the Four Walls of Framing to Build a Strong Message

How do you get a message to connect with your audience, no matter the circumstances? Frame it with four strong walls: speaker, audience, message text, and culture.

Message framing means presenting information to encourage a specific response. Communication, PR, and marketing professionals in nonprofits use framing by choosing which information to include and which to leave out. There is nothing inherently nefarious about this; it is impossible to communicate everything about an issue and given limited space and distracting environments, we must choose our messages carefully. What we choose to include is necessarily highlighted while what we leave out is diminished in the audience’s minds. This selection process helps to define a problem, attribute a cause or blame, provide a moral evaluation, or indicate a solution in an efficient and effective manner.[1]

When choosing how to present a message for the maximum effect, there are four aspects to consider in building a strong message frame:

      1. Speaker – The speaker needs to be credible, likeable, influential, charismatic and/or relatable. Conservation International has recently relied heavily on influential speakers in their video series Nature Is Speaking by featuring famous actors such as Julia Roberts and Harrison Ford. While most of us don’t have the means to acquire speakers of this stature, finding someone with whom the audience can find commonalities can be just as effective. Mercy Corps uses this to good effect in their profiles of recent Syrian refugees, highlighting a boy who just wants his normal childhood back, playing soccer and swimming with friends.
      2. Audience – Knowing your audience will make a big difference in the impact of your message. Sadly, I see too often that organizations fail to narrow their audience carefully enough, or when they do, they don’t carry out enough research to understand them well. But if you take the time to fathom the particulars of the group you most want to reach, you can find speakers that will resonate, use cultural references that are meaningful, and capture images that speak volumes.
      3. Message text – I like to think of message text as poetry. In poetry, we are told that every word should be carefully chosen to convey the exact meaning intended. Words that can convey nuanced meaning or multiple meanings can be even more valuable. Perhaps most important, words that don’t serve any purpose are discarded. Such should be the case with message text. And, of course, when you keep in mind the specific characteristics of your audience you can choose the most meaning-laden and resonant words available for them. Check out World Wildlife Fund’s Facebook page for some pithy messaging examples.
      4. Culture – No individual, and therefore, no audience can become who they are without the influence of the culture in which they live. Culture has, in fact, intimately shaped our experiences and understandings of the world. Tapping into these experiences enables communicators to easily trigger resonance and meaning. We often see memes floating around the internet. Many are silly, but this one featuring Morpheus from the Matrix actually makes a more serious point. Most of us living in western societies over the last 30+ years have seen the Matrix movies, or at least heard about them in detail, so the implications of the meme are apparent: the world is not always the way we think it is.

Framing your message with these four components will strengthen your communications much like the four walls of a well-built house: together they can create a message able to withstand the forces of a crazy news day on Twitter, an inbox full of spam, a personal crisis, or whatever else may be going on in the lives of valuable donors and supporters.

Image source: freeimages.com/Claudia Meyer

[1] Entman, R. M. (1993). Framing: Toward clarification of a fractured paradigm. Journal of Communication, 43(4), 51–58.

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